Employee or Independent Contractor?

National Labor Board Rules in Favor of Strippers Who Want to Unionize

National Labor Relations Act book

From Vice, Samantha Cole reports that the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) said that a strippers was misclassified as an independent contractor, and was an employee protected by the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA). Samantha writes:

Strippers have been fighting for fair labor practices for years. Until now, they’ve faced barriers to forming unions; most clubs hire dancers as independent contractors, making them exempt from laws protecting official collective organizing efforts within their workplaces.

On July 31, the National Labor Relations Board upheld a ruling that a stripper named Brandi Campbell was a statutory employee of the Centerfold Club in Columbus, Ohio, and that she was fired for engaging in activities protected by the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA).

The ruling, originally made in July 2019, came through dancer and labor activist Campbell’s case against Centerfold, where Campbell worked in 2018. She was hired to work at Centerfold as an independent contractor, but weeks later the club management discovered her blog, stripperlaborrights.com, and the cases she’s brought against multiple past clubs where she worked. Management fired Campbell for violating “no touching” laws—which courts later decided was a discriminatory firing.

Under the NLRA, employees who undertake collective action efforts at work are protected and have the right to unionize.

Read the full story at National Labor Board Rules in Favor of Strippers Who Want to Unionize

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